But wait, there’s more (tickle, tickle)

The weird news around the Tickled Movie continues: People that have seen it at Sundance and praise it online are being harassed.

As you know, multiple online entities and identities are very familiar to the main party in this case, I’m just saying’.

The exciting, fantabulous news? David Farrier is getting the positive attention he deserves! From Kickstarter to the big leagues, baby!

Get down with your bad self, David!

The full Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride story:

About Carla

This Bluestocking bookworm is your friendly Dollop web-wrangler and digital library curator. In other words, pay no attention to that woman behind the curtain. I'm just here to John Nash all this stuff together. It's all about connections. IT'S ALL CONNECTED. I live atop a mountain, geographically isolated for the protection of others. Yes, an American mountain.

5 Comments

  1. Here’s the story about Tickled that I am waiting to see break (if it’s true). I was at the Sundance screening of Tickled last Thursday (1/28) at 9:15 pm, at the Library Center Theater in Park City. The director was there. It’s a terrific film. My wife and I decided to skip the Q&A after. In the lobby, suddenly two cops came up the stairs towards me and headed purposefully into the theater where the Q&A was in progress. My mouth fell open. Medical emergency, maybe? I approached the Sundance volunteers who were manning the ballot boxes and asked, What on earth are the police doing here? They told me, “He’s here! The guy turned up in the audience. D’Amato.” Meaning the millionaire tickle fetishist who is exposed in the film, and who may well end up in jail now that his many victims don’t need to fear him. My wife came up and I excitedly told her. Immediately, one of the volunteers backpedalled, saying, “He was here earlier, but he’s no longer in the building.” So why are the cops arriving now? My sense was that they suddenly became concerned about creating panic, or somehow making whatever was going on worse. Not a bad idea since (as the film makes clear) this D’Amato is dangerous. What’s he doing in the audience–confronting the filmmakers? Unfortunately, we could not get back into the theater to see what, if anything, was going on. So I don’t know if D’Amato was really in the theater or not, but that’s what happened that night. As the days go by and I don’t find anything online about it, I’m wondering if the Sundance volunteers were pulling my leg. On the other hand, I saw two more cops enter the building as we left, and yet another Sundance volunteer offered a limp denial that something was going down, saying, “That’s not unusual–the police often turn up after screenings.” (Not at any other screenings I saw all week.) Regardless. that’s my story.

    • Wow, D’Amato gets creepier and creepier. Thank you for this. Glad you guys got to attend Sundance! I am looking forward to hearing more about this, myself. Let me know if you hear more, and I will do the same.

      Wow, just wow.

  2. Here’s the story about Tickled that I am waiting to see break (if it’s true). I was at the Sundance screening of Tickled last Thursday (1/28) at 9:15 pm, at the Library Center Theater in Park City. The director was there. It’s a terrific film. My wife and I decided to skip the Q&A after. In the lobby, suddenly two cops came up the stairs towards me and headed purposefully into the theater where the Q&A was in progress. My mouth fell open. Medical emergency, maybe? I approached the Sundance volunteers who were manning the ballot boxes and asked, What on earth are the police doing here? They told me, “He’s here! The guy turned up in the audience. D’Amato.” Meaning the millionaire tickle fetishist who is exposed in the film, and who may well end up in jail now that his many victims don’t need to fear him. My wife came up and I excitedly told her. Immediately, one of the volunteers backpedalled, saying, “He was here earlier, but he’s no longer in the building.” So why are the cops arriving now? My sense was that they suddenly became concerned about creating panic, or somehow making whatever was going on worse. Not a bad idea since (as the film makes clear) this D’Amato is dangerous. What’s he doing in the audience–confronting the filmmakers? Unfortunately, we could not get back into the theater to see what, if anything, was going on. So I don’t know if D’Amato was really in the theater or not, but that’s what happened that night. As the days go by and I don’t find anything online about it, I’m wondering if the Sundance volunteers were pulling my leg. On the other hand, I saw two more cops enter the building as we left, and yet another Sundance volunteer offered a limp denial that something was going down, saying, “That’s not unusual–the police often turn up after screenings.” (Not at any other screenings I saw all week.) Regardless. that’s my story.

    • Wow, D’Amato gets creepier and creepier. Thank you for this. Glad you guys got to attend Sundance! I am looking forward to hearing more about this, myself. Let me know if you hear more, and I will do the same.

      Wow, just wow.

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